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Kevin Soltow
Kevin Soltow
Cloud and Virtualization Architect. Kevin focuses on VMware technologies and has vast expertise in cloud solutions, virtualization, storage, networking, and IT infrastructure administration.
Kevin Soltow

Looking for the most affordable cloud storage? AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud vs Backblaze B2 vs Wasabi

Are you tired of overspending on storage solutions that don’t quite fit your budget? We’ve done the research for you and compiled a comprehensive comparison of some of the top cloud storage providers: AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, Backblaze B2, and Wasabi.

Kevin Soltow

How to Replace Your Default ESXi SSL Certificate With a Self-Signed Certificate: a 101 Introduction

Everybody knows that SSL certificates are a must-have for every safe network. However, anybody who has ever worked with ESXi hosts has sometimes had to deal with untrusted certificates, which can become quite tedious. Fortunately, there is a sure fix.

Kevin Soltow

ESXi is free… So why would you buy an ESXi anyway?

Most admins know that VMware offers Free and Evaluation versions of their hypervisor. However, there are still some nuances that explain why people would actually buy ESXi.

Kevin Soltow

The 3-2-1 Backup Rule – Why Your Data Will Always Survive

Data loss can happen to anyone. Don’t risk it! Explore the 3-2-1 Backup Rule for ultimate protection.

Kevin Soltow

How to Replace Your Default ESXi SSL certificate With the Help of a Local Domain Certificate Authority (CA): a 101 Introduction

In the previous article, I have shared a working algorithm on replacing the ESXi SSL certificate with a self-signed one, but, as you know well, there’s always room for perfection. So, I have been practicing with a more universal scenario that could also work with a domain infrastructure and domain certificate services. That’s what I came up with.

Kevin Soltow

VMware Tools 11: What’s This All About?

 

Before starting to talk about new features and improvements, I suggest we take a little trip down memory lane.

Kevin Soltow

ESXi vSphere vSwitch Load Balancing Options: Pros & Cons

Previously, I shared my experience with certain problems with NIC Load Balancing on ESXi host and how they can be solved with ESXCLI. Some of my colleagues have been asking me what the difference between several types of load balancing and which one is better for use is. So, now I’m sharing my thoughts about concepts of network environment load balancing on the infrastructure level.

Kevin Soltow

Tips and Tricks to Troubleshoot Poor vSphere Performance

As any other admin, you know that the VMs eventually start to suffer from disruptions, performance problems, or simply stop responding. That is a fact of life, unfortunately. Chances are, as a virtualization engineer, you’ve probably already met these problems at least once. And since the virtualized environment is quite a complicated system, there can be too many different reasons or factors that impact poor VM performance. Trying to find out what is wrong can take a lot of your time.

Kevin Soltow

Building FreeBSD File Server

Recently at my job, I was faced with a task to develop a file server explicitly suited for the requirements of the company. Needless to say, any configuration of a kind depends on what the infrastructure needs. So, drawing from my personal experience and numerous materials on the web, I came up with the combination FreeBSD+SAMBA+AD as the most appropriate. This combination is a harmonic addition to the existing network configuration since and enables admins with a broad range of possibilities for access control in Windows-based infrastructures. Also, Samba allows you to apply its network resources for Windows client OSs without any additional configurations required. Moreover, FreeBSD is well-documented.

Kevin Soltow

NIC Load Balancing on ESXi host: ESXCLI is the go-to choice

NIC or ports teaming in ESXi allows the hypervisor to share traffic among the physical and virtual networks, thereby increasing the bandwidth of vSphere virtual switch or a group of ports. It allows to load balance network traffic in the event of a hardware or network failure. Configuring the load balancing policy enables you to decide how exactly a standard switch is going to load balance the traffic between the physical NICs.

The team load balancing policy specifies how the virtual switch will load balance the traffic between the groups of ports. Nevertheless, there’s, of course, a catch. In case the established load balancing policy doesn’t match the networking equipment your host is connected to, there’ll be problems connecting your recently configured ESXi.

The team load balancing policy specifies how the virtual switch will load balance the traffic between the groups of ports. Nevertheless, there’s, of course, a catch. In case the established load balancing policy doesn’t match the networking equipment your host is connected to, there’ll be problems connecting your recently configured ESXi. This is precisely when the ability to configure the load balancing policy through the ESXi console has a moment to shine. It’s even more useful if a host is at a remote location. The point is, a lot of people think that not being able to ping the host is the end of the story. In most cases, this is quite possible, but if you still can console into the ESXi host through out-of-band remote management (IDRAC or else), all is not lost.