You got SDN, now what
Posted by Michael Ryom on October 20, 2016
5/5 (2)

vRealize Network Insight Banner

It has three years since VMware announced and showcased NSX to the world. Since then everyone and then some has announced their version of SDN. You have players such a Cisco, Cumulus Networks and of course VMware in this space. All doing SDN in their own unique way. Cisco being the biggest network player of course wants to move hardware to your datacenter. Therefore, their way to SDN is to buy new boxes. Another player is Cumulus Networks, again theirs another focus. Here the OS is king. Build on open source components Cumulus Networks deliver the OS for SDN, which run on any white box. If you do not want to build your own white box networks based on Cumulus Networks many vendors have, join Cumulus Networks. Vendors such as HPE, Dell and Supermicro amongst others are selling switches, which comes with Cumulus Networks OS baked in. Even Microsoft is entering the stage of SDN with Server 2016, though one could argue a bit late, but then better late than never.


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VMware Horizon FLEX. The architecture and the key features
Posted by Alex Samoylenko on October 20, 2016
4/5 (1)

As far back as 2 years ago at VMworld Europe 2014 conference VMware announced the release of the VMware Horizon FLEX solution. It is a virtualization platform for desktops, which allows running virtual machines locally on users’ computers, both on Mac and with Windows, while connection to the company’s datacenter isn’t available. At the same time, the virtual machine utilized by the user can be Windows-based or have guest OS Linux inside.

Many virtual infrastructures administrators still remember that before VMware had VMware ACE and VMware View Local Mode products, which passed long ago and now have been replaced with FLEX technology. Since VMware Horizon FLEX 1.9 version, as well as the new versions of Workstation and Fusion desktop platforms, has been released just recently, let’s look closer at the FLEX solution and consider its key features.

VMware Horizon FLEX isn’t a standalone product, but a mixed technology based on three solutions:

three solutions of VMware Horizon FLEX


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The latest updates in vSphere 6.5 and VSAN 6.5
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on October 18, 2016
4.86/5 (7)


This day has come – vSphere 6.5 has been just announced. As many of you I have been waiting for the presentation of new vSphere during VMworld event in the USA, but I guess VMware preferred to use vSphere 6.5 as a treat for those who were in doubt whether to attend VMworld Europe or not after all VMworld US were made available online to everyone; or perhaps VMware hasn’t decided what features should be included into the GA release.

In this post, I will try to cover all new features of vSphere 6.5 and VSAN 6.5, but if I missed something feel free to let me know by leaving a comment.

To be honest, there is so much to talk about and some of the new features require separate posts to be explained properly. Therefore, please don’t expect detailed review of the every single feature.. This is more ‘What’s new in vSphere 6.5 and VSAN 6.5′ overview, but in the future posts I will be talking about some of the most interesting improvements and enhancements in detail.

DB/File replication

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vRops 6.3 – Walkthrough new features
Posted by Michael Ryom on October 4, 2016
5/5 (5)

vRops 6.3 has been announced. I have already upgraded a test environment of mine and a few production environment and are talking to customers who what’s to upgrade asap. There are differently some great features in there that make an upgrade worthwhile.

Before I jump in and show case all the cool improvements and added features. A word of caution BEFORE upgrading make sure all endpoint operations agents have been upgraded. vRops 6.3 is not backwards compatible with 6.x agents.

vRealizw Operation Manager

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How VMware sees IT future. VMworld 2016. Day 1.
Posted by Alex Samoylenko on September 1, 2016
4/5 (1)

As you know, the main virtualization conference VMworld 2016 arranged by VMware is now being held in Las Vegas. On the first day of the conference several interesting announcements were made. For example, VMware Cloud Foundation, which soon will be available on the IBM platform and later with other vendors, as well, was presented. It allows to get a ready-made infrastructure at customer’s site with both necessary software and hardware components and ready, configured and integrated control and automation tools like NSX, Virtual SAN and vRealize:

VMware Cloud Foundation (more…)

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vSphere Auto Deploy
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on August 22, 2016
5/5 (1)

The Auto Deploy is one of the underestimated vSphere features. I have seen many vSphere Designs where using Auto Deploy was outlined as overcomplicating and manual build of ESXi servers was preferred. That is pretty frustrating as we, as IT professionals, strive to automate as much as possible in our day to day work.

Configuring Auto Deploy is definitely not as simple as VSAN for instance, but using Auto Deploy really pays off when you manage hundreds and thousands of ESXi hosts.

ESXi Offline Bundle


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Choosing ideal mini server for a home lab
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on August 11, 2016
5/5 (4)

Yesterday I saw a blog post in Homelab subreddit discussing what Intel NUC to choose. I have spent quite some time recently to choose the right server for my homelab expansion and I have considered a lot of options.

I was also looking at Intel  NUC as many other fellow IT professionals, but luckily last month I read on that Supermicro had just released new Mini-1U SuperServers – SYS-E300-8D and SYS-E200-8D.  I had some discussions with my colleagues and other people on Reddit and TinkerTry and I came to the conclusion that if you are aimed to run home lab for virtualization Intel NUC shouldn’t be considered. I believe SuperMicro is a new king on the market of mini servers for home lab.


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The HTML5 Web Client Fling
Posted by Mike Preston on August 9, 2016
4.5/5 (2)

VMware has long stopped adding newly released features and functionality into the old С# client in hopes to push their customers into using the vSphere Web Client.  However, even by restricting new features only to the Web Client adoption has been slow – partly due to change, no one likes change, but mostly due to the slowness and the overall sluggishness that is experienced using the flash based vSphere Web Client.

Just this year with the release of vSphere 6.0 Update 2 we saw something called the “Embedded Host Client” make its way into a release – allowing us to manage our individual ESXi hosts with an HTML5 based interface built right into the product.  Now we are seeing this same type of HTML5 technology being used with the vSphere HTML5 Web Client fling being released.

vSphere client


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vSphere Replication traffic isolation
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on July 27, 2016
5/5 (2)

vSphere Replication has proved to be a great bonus to any paid vSphere license. It is an amazing and simple tool that provides cheap and semi-automated Disaster Recovery solution. Another great use case for vSphere Replication is migration of virtual machines.

vSphere Replication 6.x came with plenty of new useful features:

  • Network traffic compression to reduce replication time and bandwidth consumption
  • Linux guest OS quiescing
  • Increase in scalability – one VRA server can replicate up to 2000 virtual machines
  • Replication Traffic isolation – that is what we are going to talk today.

The goal of traffic separation is to enhance network performance by ensuring the replication traffic does not impact other business critical traffic. This can be done either by using VDS Network Input Output Control to set limits or shares for outgoing or incoming replication traffic. Another benefit of traffic isolation addresses security concern of mixing sensitive replication traffic with other traffic types.

the replication traffic flow

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Instant Clone functionality in VMware Horizon 7 – how quickly and efficiently it works
Posted by Alex Samoylenko on July 22, 2016
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As far back as at VMworld 2014, VMware announced VMware Project Fargo technology, also broadly known as VMFork. It allows to make a working copy of a running virtual machine on VMware vSphere platform very fast.

The VMFork technology involves on-the-fly creation of virtual machine clone (VMX-file and process in memory), which uses the same memory (Shared memory) that the parent VM does. At the same time, the child VM cannot write to the shared memory and uses the allocated memory to write its own data. With disks, it is just the same: with the Copy-on-write technology, the changes of the parent VM base disk are written to the child VM delta disk:

VMFork technology


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