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Samsung reveals new super-fast 960 Pro and 960 Evo M.2 NVMe SSDs
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on September 23, 2016
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Samsung announced its 960 PRO and 960 Evo, the next generation M.2 PCIe SSDs. Like the 950 Pro, the 960 Pro and 960 Evo are PCIe 3.0 x4 drives using the latest NVMe protocol for data transfer. The 960 Pro offers a peak read speed of 3.5GB/s and a peak write speed of 2.1GB/s, while the Evo offers 3.2GB/s and 1.9GB/s respectively. The 950 topped out at a mere 2.5GB/s and 1.5GB/s.

The 960 Pro and the 960 Evo are planned for release in October. The Pro starts at $329 for 512GB of storage, rising up to a cool $1,299 for a 2TB version. The Evo price goes from $129 for a 250GB version to $479 for a 1TB version.

Samsung 960 Pro M.2 NVMe SSDs
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Is NVMe Really Revolutionary?
Posted by Jon Toigo on August 19, 2016
4/5 (1)

To hear advocates talk about NVMe – a de facto standard created by a group of vendors led by Intel to connect flash memory storage directly to a PCIe bus (that is, without using a SAS/SATA disk controller) – it is the most revolutionary thing that has ever happened in business computing.  While the technology provides a more efficient means to access flash memory, without passing I/O through the buffers, queues and locks associated with a SAS/SATA controller, it can be seen as the latest of a long line of bus extension technologies – and perhaps one that is currently in search of a problem to solve.

I am not against faster I/O processing, of course.  It would be great if the world finally acknowledged that storage has always been the red-headed stepchild of the Von Neumann machine.  Bus speeds and CPU processing speeds have always been capable of driving I/O faster than mechanical storage devices could handle.  That is why engineers used lots of memory – as caches ahead of disk storage or as buffers on disk electronics directly – to help mask or spoof the mismatch of speed.

latency comparison

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Seagate introduces 60TB SSD drive
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on August 16, 2016
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Seagate shows off two new SSD products: an 8TB NVMe drive and a spacious 60TB SSD prototype in a 3.5-inch form factor.

This 60TB consists of more than a 1,000 Micron 3D NAND dice fitted into a full-size, 3.5-inch disk form factor package. Apparently, it has dual port 12Gbit/s SAS interface and 150,000 random read IOPS, with undisclosed write IOPS. The sequential read/write numbers should be 1.5 and 1.0GB/sec.

Nytro XP7200

       Nytro XP7200  with heat sink on top

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Choosing ideal mini server for a home lab
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on August 11, 2016
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Yesterday I saw a blog post in Homelab subreddit discussing what Intel NUC to choose. I have spent quite some time recently to choose the right server for my homelab expansion and I have considered a lot of options.

I was also looking at Intel  NUC as many other fellow IT professionals, but luckily last month I read on Tinkertry.com that Supermicro had just released new Mini-1U SuperServers – SYS-E300-8D and SYS-E200-8D.  I had some discussions with my colleagues and other people on Reddit and TinkerTry and I came to the conclusion that if you are aimed to run home lab for virtualization Intel NUC shouldn’t be considered. I believe SuperMicro is a new king on the market of mini servers for home lab.

SYS-E200-8D
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The first 3D and triple-level cell (TLC) SSDs by Micron
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on June 3, 2016
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Micron has announced its first 3D NAND SSDs, triple-level cell (3bits/cell) 1100 and 2200 products.

The 1100 is a 6Gbit/s SATA product coming in 2.5-inch and M.2 SATA formats in 256GB, 512GB, 1024GB and 2048GB (2.5-inch only) capacity points, it uses 32-layer TLC NAND with 384Gb dice.Micron 1100 3D NAND SSD in the M.2 form factor

Micron 1100 3D NAND SSD in the M.2 form factor

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TBW from SSDs with S.M.A.R.T Values in ESXi
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on May 23, 2016
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Solid-State-Drives are becoming widely implemented in ESXi hosts for caching (vFlash Read Cache, PernixData FVP), Virtual SAN or plain Datastores. Unfortunately, SSDs have  limited lifetime per cell. Its value may range from 1.000 times in consumer TLC SSDs up to 100.000 times in enterprise SLC based SSDs. Lifetime can be estimated by device TBW parameters provided by vendor in its specification, It describes how many Terabytes can be written to the entire device, until the warranty expires.smartctl_in_esxi

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SanDisk X400 SSD Review
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on April 25, 2016
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SanDisk is one of few companies currently offering 1TB of storage in a single-sided M.2 card – its product  X400 SSD. X400 also comes in a 2.5″ 7mm-height form factor, but the M.2 configuration is the main selling point of this line. 1TB M.2 X400 card allows getting the most out of the ultra-thin notebooks in terms of storage, without sacrificing performance or battery life.1SanDisk-X400

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World’s fastest SSD
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on March 11, 2016
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Seagate has announced the release of so-called “the world’s fastest SSD” with the significant  performance differential between it and the next closest competitive device. The new SSD is compatible with the Open Compute Project specification, employs NVMe protocol, and is capable of 10GB/sec of throughput when used in 16-lane PCIe slots, which is 4GB/sec faster than the next fast competing solution.

seagate_ssd67GB

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Hewlett-Packard Enterprise introduces new naming convention
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on February 11, 2016
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4.6/5 (15)

New Integrity MC990 X is the first server in a line conforming to the new naming convention, with ‘MC’ standing for ‘mission critical’ and ‘X’ standing for ‘Xeon’.It replaces the Proliant DL980 (‘DL’ – ‘density line’). The name changes are implemented in order to meet specific customer needs, e.g., high performance and cloud computing. HP will keep the Proliant name for low-end and mid-range servers, and also keep the BL (blade) designation.

HPserver

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RAID: Parity RAID vs SSD
Posted by Anton Kolomyeytsev on October 2, 2015
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The post describes the history of RAID 5 and how it became obsolete at some point in time, just because HDD capacity grew at an enormous rate. It happened due to the chance of failure that grew to literal imminence when spinning disks reached TB scale, because the reading speed still had the same physical limits. Basically, creating a RAID 5 even with 1 TB disks would mean certain failure of the whole array and quite soon. The array technology was “saved” by an unlikely ally – the SSD. Being faster than hard disk drives in everything, they almost nullify the chance of the abovementioned failures. The post is written for everyday reader, not just engineers, and is quite comprehensive even without special knowledge and skills.

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