Free Webinar
October 11 | 11am PT / 2pm ET
Learn how to build an IT infrastructure of your dream
with Dell EMC PowerEdge 14G servers
Speaker: Ivan Talaichuk, Pre-Sales Engineer, StarWind
Posted by Romain Serre on August 30, 2018
In-Place upgrade domain controllers from Windows Server 2016 to Windows Server 2019

Windows Server 2019 should be available in barely two months. So, first migration will start shortly after. By experience, I know that first feature customers ask for migrating is Active Directory. Therefore, I wanted to try In-Place Upgrade which has been improved in Windows Server 2019. To try this feature, I upgraded a forest that is handled by two domain controllers running on Windows Server 2016. It was not a “click and fun” process, but Microsoft has really improved the In-Place upgrade. Let’s take a look of how to migrate Windows Server 2016 DC to 2019.

Learn More

Posted by Romain Serre on July 5, 2018
Why you should consider Storage Spaces Direct in Windows Server 2019

For the first time, Microsoft made an online Windows Server Summit at June 26th 2019. Microsoft talked about hybrid cloud, security, cloud native application and hyperconverged solution. Some of the new features which are coming with Windows Server 2019 were unleashed. In this topic, I’d like to summary what are the new features and why you should consider Storage Spaces Direct for a new installation or to update your existing cluster.

Learn More

Posted by Boris Yurchenko on June 12, 2018
Basic Hyper-V virtual NIC management

Let’s be honest, any system administrator may face the need of hot-adding the network interfaces to the guest VMs in his Microsoft Hyper-V environment one day. And that’s no problem as Windows Server 2016 brought in a whole set of useful features, one of which is the ability to add and remove network adapters on the running VMs. Moreover, you can do that in two ways – GUI, if you’re looking for a straightforward process and PowerShell if you are a fan of automation.

Learn More

Posted by Alex Khorolets on April 3, 2018
Windows Server 2016 Core configuration. Part 3: Failover Clustering

Looking back at the previous articles in our “How-to-Core basics”, we have managed to install the Core version of Windows Server 2016. As well, the required networks were set, and the storage for the virtual machines was created. In the final part of the trilogy, I’ll cover the steps left to prepare the environment in order to make your production highly available and fault-tolerant.

Learn More

Posted by Vladan Seget on March 1, 2018
How to enable Active Directory Recycle Bin in Windows Server 2016

Before we dive into how to enable Active Directory Recycle Bin in Windows Server 2016, we will first explain what it is and when Microsoft introduced this feature. Active Directory Recycle Bin simply allows you to restore deleted objects from Active Directory. It can be a user account, computer account or a whole Organizational Unit (OU). Who did not accidentally delete an AD object in his career?
Without this feature enabled, you had only a few choices. Either you could restore if you used a backup solution allowing you to restore individual AD objects (many virtualization backup vendors do that nowadays). Or you have had less chance and your AD server wasn’t configured to be backed up and you have to recreate the user and reinstall his profile on his computer.

 

Learn More

Posted by Boris Yurchenko on January 11, 2018
Cluster Rolling Upgrade from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016

During its lifetime, any system reaches a point when it needs to be upgraded, either in terms of hardware or software. Today, I will talk about such changes, in particular, about upgrading Windows Failover Cluster nodes from Windows Server 2012 R2 to Windows Server 2016 with no production interruption. Thanks to Microsoft, we do have a Cluster Rolling Upgrade procedure at our fingertips, and I am going to get through it and confirm it works for virtualized disks as cluster shared volumes in Windows Failover Cluster. This procedure assumes rebuilding nodes with clean OS deployment one by one, while the production keeps running from the other cluster node.

Learn More

Posted by Vitalii Feshchenko on December 13, 2017
Combining Virtual SAN (vSAN) with Microsoft Storage Spaces for greater Performance and better Resiliency

Previously, we went through the Storage Spaces configuration journey. The latest step was the creation of the storage pool and the virtual disk. Today I would like to proceed from that point on and create Highly Available (HA) devices with StarWind Virtual SAN on Storage Spaces as an underlying storage. The main goal of this post is to run the performance tests of StarWind Highly Available (HA) devices located on Storage Spaces created in different ways (Simple and Mirror). StarWind HA devices will be mirrored between two hosts via a 40Gbps synchronization channel.

Learn More

Posted by Didier Van Hoye on December 5, 2017
Using a VEEAM off-host backup proxy server for backing up Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V Hosts

Many years ago, I wrote a white paper on how to configure a VEEAM Off-host backup proxy server for backing up a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V cluster that uses a hardware VSS provider with VEEAM Backup & Replication 7.0.  It has aged well and you can still use it as a guide to set it all up. But in this article, I revisit the use of a hardware VSS provider dedicated specifically to some changes in Windows Server 2016 and its use by Veeam Backup & Replication v9.5 or later. The information here is valid for any good hardware VSS provider like the one StarWind Virtual SAN provides (see Do I need StarWind Hardware VSS provider?)

Learn More

Posted by Didier Van Hoye on November 21, 2017
Take a look at Storage QoS Policies in Windows Server 2016

In Windows Server 2016 Microsoft introduced storage Quality of Service (QoS) policies.  Previously in Windows Server 2012 R2, we could set minimum and maximum IOPS individually virtual hard disk but this was limited even if you could automate it with PowerShell. The maximum was enforced but the minimum not. That only logged a warning if it could be delivered and it took automation that went beyond what was practical for many administrators when it needed to be done at scale. While it was helpful and I used it in certain scenarios it needed to mature to deliver real value and offer storage QoS in environments where cost-effective, highly available storage was used that often doesn’t include native QoS capabilities for use with Hyper-V.

Learn More

Posted by Nicolas Prigent on November 7, 2017
Introducing Microsoft ‘Project Honolulu’

Microsoft continues to invest and expand its PowerShell Scripting Environment but sometimes it is necessary to use a graphical interface in order to manage systems. This is the reason why Microsoft also develops a new management tool called “Project Honolulu”. Honolulu is the modern evolution of traditional MMC, first introduced in 2000. Now, it’s time to update our management tools! In this article, I will describe how to download and install Honolulu.

Learn More