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Posted by Michael Rakitin on November 23, 2018
Complete an infrastructure project for your organization with iSCSI SAN

Nowadays, it is obvious, that most organizations require an IT system to operate effectively. Even companies which are not related to IT need data storage that is continuously available, highly performed, and cheap. Thus, IT staff is challenged to build innovative, fast, modern and reliable IT systems that fit budget constraints and save some resources for future growth.

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Posted by Boris Yurchenko on November 21, 2018
Log-structured Write Cache – forget about post-blackout full syncs

In this blog post, I will make an overview of how Log-structured Write Cache can be configured. Additionally, I will make some power outage tests to check the operation of LWC under the conditions that are pretty close to the real power outages, which, in fact, are the most common reason for the full synchronization triggered on StarWind HA devices. Check the list of possible reasons of full sync to get a better idea about the cases where LWC can help you.

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Posted by Alex Bykovskyi on October 25, 2018
StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere Linux Software RAID configuration

The present series of articles describes StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere edition. In the first article, I talked about what StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere is and how to set it up on the hardware RAID. StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere is not just a simple Windows VM but a ready-to-go Linux-based VM. Using StarWind VSAN for vSphere, the process of deploying VMs, providing storage, connecting it, and creating highly available VMs becomes as easy as ABC.

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Posted by Alex Bykovskyi on September 25, 2018
StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere

In this article, I discuss what StarWind Virtual SAN for vSphere is and how to set it up on the hardware RAID. StarWind VSAN for vSphere is a Software-Defined Storage solution that is designed specifically for vSphere environments. It comes as a preconfigured VM template, so just a couple of quick steps are needed to start running your vSphere environment on StarWind VSAN: download the solution, deploy it, and “play”. Here, I want to share some tips and tricks on working with VSAN for vSphere.

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Posted by Scott Alan Miller on March 20, 2018
RAID Today

You may have heard that RAID is no longer applicable for enterprise storage: that it’s time had passed. RAID has dominated enterprise storage for decades and, while not a hot topic of conversation today, it remains a key strategic approach for businesses to consider. To some degree, it is true, RAID is no longer the singular answer to enterprise storage that it once was.  For decades it was unchallenged as a technology and as an approach, and so reigned alone – a foregone conclusion in a giant sea of storage.  Today, RAIN has joined the space and is a viable alternative to RAID in many scenarios.  But just because RAIN is newer and the darling of storage conversations does not mean that RAIN will simply displace RAID nor that RAID’s position of importance has been eliminated.  Not at all.

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Posted by Vitalii Feshchenko on October 24, 2017
How to configure a Multi-Resilient Volume on Windows Server 2016 using Storage Spaces

Plenty of articles have been released about Storage Spaces and everything around this topic. However, I would like to absorb all actual information and lead you through the journey of configuring Storage Spaces on a Standalone host. The main goal of the article is to show a Multi-Resilient Volume configuration process. In order to use Storage Spaces, we need to have faster (NVMe, SSD) and slower (HDD) devices. So, we have a set of NVMe devices along with SAS HDD or SATA HDD, and we should create performance and capacity tier respectively.

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Posted by Taras Shved on February 10, 2017
Storage Spaces Direct: Enabling S2D work with unsupported device types (BusType = NVMe, RAID, Fibre Channel)

Microsoft Storage Spaces Direct is a new storage feature introduced in Windows Server 2016 Datacenter, which significantly extends the Software-Defined Storage stack in Windows Server product family and allows users building highly available storage systems using directly attached drives. Storage Spaces Direct, or S2D, simplifies the deployment and management of Software-Defined Storage systems and allows using more disk devices classes like SATA and NVMe drives. Previously, it was not possible to use these types of storage with clustered Storage Spaces with shared disks. Storage Spaces Direct can use drives that are locally attached to nodes in a cluster or disks that are attached to nodes using enclosure. It aggregates all the disks into a single Storage Pool and enables the creation of virtual disks on top.

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Posted by Vladislav Karaiev on January 4, 2017
Storage HA on the Cheap: Fixing Synology DiskStation flaky Performance with StarWind Free. Part 1 (Architecture)

DiskStation DS916+ is a further improvement of DS415+ model. Storage capacity in DS916+ can be scaled using DX513 expansion units, making a total of nine 3.5 disk bays. Given the relatively small form factor and impressive capacity potential, such configuration may become a great solution for small businesses and enthusiasts.

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Posted by Askar Kopbayev on November 8, 2016
Back to basics – RAID types

If you ever worked in IT, you have heard the acronym RAID.  RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent (some call it Inexpensive) Disks. So, it basically refers to a group of disk logically presented as one or more volumes to the external system – a server, for instance. The main two reasons to have RAID are Performance and Redundancy.  With RAID, you can minimize the access time and increase the throughput of data. RAID also allows one or more disks in the array to fail without losing any data.

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Posted by Romain Serre on September 23, 2016
Manage VM placement in Hyper-V cluster with VMM

The placement of the virtual machines in a Hyper-V cluster is an important step to ensure performance and high availability. To make a highly available application, usually, a cluster is deployed spread across two or more virtual machines. In case of a Hyper-V node is crashing, the application must keep working.

But the VM placement concerns also its storage and its network. Let’s think about a storage solution where you have several LUNs (or Storage Spaces) according to a service level. Maybe you have an LUN with HDD in RAID 6 and another in RAID 1 with SSD. You don’t want that the VM which requires intensive IO was placed on HDD LUN.

Storage Classification in Virtual Machine Manager

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