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Is NVMe Really Revolutionary?
Posted by Jon Toigo on August 19, 2016
4/5 (1)

To hear advocates talk about NVMe – a de facto standard created by a group of vendors led by Intel to connect flash memory storage directly to a PCIe bus (that is, without using a SAS/SATA disk controller) – it is the most revolutionary thing that has ever happened in business computing.  While the technology provides a more efficient means to access flash memory, without passing I/O through the buffers, queues and locks associated with a SAS/SATA controller, it can be seen as the latest of a long line of bus extension technologies – and perhaps one that is currently in search of a problem to solve.

I am not against faster I/O processing, of course.  It would be great if the world finally acknowledged that storage has always been the red-headed stepchild of the Von Neumann machine.  Bus speeds and CPU processing speeds have always been capable of driving I/O faster than mechanical storage devices could handle.  That is why engineers used lots of memory – as caches ahead of disk storage or as buffers on disk electronics directly – to help mask or spoof the mismatch of speed.

latency comparison

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Choosing ideal mini server for a home lab
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on August 11, 2016
5/5 (4)

Yesterday I saw a blog post in Homelab subreddit discussing what Intel NUC to choose. I have spent quite some time recently to choose the right server for my homelab expansion and I have considered a lot of options.

I was also looking at Intel  NUC as many other fellow IT professionals, but luckily last month I read on Tinkertry.com that Supermicro had just released new Mini-1U SuperServers – SYS-E300-8D and SYS-E200-8D.  I had some discussions with my colleagues and other people on Reddit and TinkerTry and I came to the conclusion that if you are aimed to run home lab for virtualization Intel NUC shouldn’t be considered. I believe SuperMicro is a new king on the market of mini servers for home lab.

SYS-E200-8D
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The world’s first 1,000 core CPU has been built
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on July 8, 2016
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The Kilocore chip represents a step change in CPU power and efficiency.

The significant increase in computing power over the past decades gave way to the most of todays advances in science and technology, such as artificial intelligence, secure global communications, or large-scale pharmaceutical analyses.

kilocore processor

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NUMA and Cluster-on-die
Posted by Askar Kopbayev on May 27, 2016
4.5/5 (2)

What is NUMA?

NUMA stands for Non Unified Memory Access and Nehalem was the first generation of Intel CPUs where NUMA was presented. However, the first commercial implementation of NUMA goes back to 1985, developed in Honeywell Information Systems Italy XPS-100 by Dan Gielan.

Unified Memory Access topology

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Google, Rackspace to together unfurl DIY Power9 server designs
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on April 12, 2016
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Google and Rackspace cooperate over creating a new server configuration based on IBM Power9 processors. The design is expected to be shared as part of the Open Compute Project. The hardware set will include 48V Open Compute racks by Google and Facebook collaborative development.IBM Power9

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Need Hard Processor affinity for Hyper-V?
Posted by Didier Van Hoye on March 22, 2016
4.85/5 (13)

Introduction

The need or perceived need for hard CPU processor affinity stems from a desire to offer the best possible guaranteed performance.  The use cases for this do exist but the problems they try to solve or the needs they try to meet might be better served by a different design or architecture such as dedicated hardware. This is especially true when this requirement is limited to a single or only a few virtual machines needing lots of resources and high performance that are mixed into an environment where maximum density is a requirement. In such cases, the loss of flexibility by the Hyper-V CPU scheduler in regards to selecting where to source the time slices of CPU cycles is detrimental. The high performance requirements of such VMs also means turning of NUMA spanning. Combining processor affinity and high performance with maximum virtual machine density is a complex order to fulfill, no matter what.\

CPU

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