Azure Stack in GA. Part III: Support Models and the Azure Pack Story
Posted by Augusto Alvarez on August 29, 2017
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This is going to be the third article in the series of reviewing and understanding Azure Stack (previous articles: Azure Stack Release and Deployment Models). Now that we have a good grasp of the platform, how the Integrated Systems come into play and features available; I want to extend the topics to other two important matters for existing customers of Azure: How the support model will work with hardware and software in place from different vendors; and what’s the interconnection with the already existing Azure Pack solution.

Microsoft Azure Stack on premises

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Azure Stack in GA. Part II: Deployment Models and How Much is Going to Cost
Posted by Augusto Alvarez on August 8, 2017
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I’ve recently covered in my previous post about Azure Stack being finally released to the Integration Systems (Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo). We covered in the article the clarification of what Azure Stack actually means, features and functionalities available. In this second part will go beyond, reviewing how much is going to cost, deployment alternatives, Azure integration, and the disconnected scenario.

Azure Stack

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Microsoft Azure Stack in General Availability (GA) and Customers will Receive it in September. Why is this Important? Part I
Posted by Augusto Alvarez on July 18, 2017
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Microsoft’s Hybrid Cloud appliance to run Azure in your datacenter has finally reached to General Availability (GA) and the Integration Systems (Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo for this first iteration) are formally taking orders from customers, which will receive their Azure Stack solution in September. But, what exactly represents Azure Stack? Why is this important to organizations?

Microsoft Azure Stack logo

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VMware’s EVO:RAIL fail as a lesson for Microsoft’s Azure Stack
Posted by Oksana Zybinskaya on July 21, 2016
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As we know, VMware‘s first attempt in the field of hyperconvergence, the EVO:RAIL, was a good quality software product set, which nevertheless failed because of the licensing policy. Specifically, it demanded that buyers acquire new vSphere licences, with no exception for existing vSphere users who liked the idea of adopting hyperconverged infrastructure.

Azure

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